How My Passion for Writing Has Sustained Me


Source: © By Antonio Guillem | Shutterstock

It is 3:30 AM and I’m in the hospital to treat a month-plus-lengthy asthma flare for which a course of higher-dose oral steroids has not worked. My pulmonologist lastly told me I had to be admitted to the hospital to get many days of IV steroids to attempt to break the cycle. I have to admit I was miserable at residence.

I was continuously quick of breath, my chest felt tight, and I was coughing. Not to mention the side effects of the steroids like insomnia and improved hunger and weight gain—which is so compatible with a history of anorexia (note the sarcasm)—and I felt as even though I was on an emotional roller coaster with anxiousness, mood swings, and irritability, My mental wellness is as well challenging-won and I wasn’t going to drop it to asthma and prednisone.

I brought my laptop or computer with me due to the fact I knew the days would be lengthy and boring. I knew I would miss my dog Shelby (she is in very good hands at my brother’s residence). And I knew in addition to writing, I may be in a position to get some work accomplished on my startup. Maybe a small optimistic there.

My one particular constant coping ability for the duration of this flare was writing. I really like writing for my readers on this weblog each and every week, coming up with material I assume will resonate with you.

© Photo by Lisa from Pexels

Source: © Photo by Lisa from Pexels

There is no understating how highly effective a coping tool writing has been for me and how substantial a aspect placing words to paper has played in keeping my emotional wellness. Whether writing a formal piece intended for publication or scribbling in a journal, the words just meant for me, the impact of releasing my feelings into the universe, feels extremely freeing.

It’s no coincidence, I assume, that I stopped self-harming, correct about the time I began writing. Writing is a sustainable higher, and seeing my name in print gives me with a unique type of joy. I know I worked challenging for it and the sense of satisfaction is undeniable.

James Pennebaker, a social psychologist from the University of Texas in Austin who has studied extensively how writing about emotional upheavals in our lives can strengthen physical and mental wellness, states, “Expressive writing gives us the opportunity to stand back and reevaluate issues in our lives.” Writing offers us the luxury of time. We can create about an occasion the day right after, a month, a year, or even decades later.

Pennebaker goes on to say, “One of the brain’s functions is to help us understand events in our lives. Writing helps construct a narrative to contextualize trauma and organize ideas. Until we do this, the brain replays the same non-constructive thought patterns over and over and we become stuck.”

Needless to say, I have no intention of stopping. Writing is firmly entrenched and has turn into a passion. I will need to create. Writing keeps me sane.

© Andrea Rosenhaft

Source: © Andrea Rosenhaft



Originally published in www.psychologytoday.com